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  1. mu·sic
    IPA[ˈmyo͞ozik]
  2. n. noun

    • 1. vocal or instrumental sounds (or both) combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony, and expression of emotion:

      couples were dancing to the music baroque music
    • 2. the art or science of composing or performing music:

      he devoted his life to music
    • 3. a sound perceived as pleasingly harmonious:

      the background music of softly lapping water
    • 4. the written or printed signs representing vocal or instrumental sound:

      Tony learned to read music
    • 5. the score or scores of a musical composition or compositions:

      the music was open on a stand
  3. Variation

    • n.: noun: music

    • noun

      vocal or instrumental sounds (or both) combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form, harmony, and expression of emotion:

      the art or science of composing or performing music:

    • n. noun

      serious or conventional music following long-established principles rather than a folk, jazz, or popular tradition.

      (more specifically) music written in the European tradition during a period lasting approximately from 1750 to 1830, when forms such as the symphony, concerto, and sonata were standardized.

    • n. noun

      traditional music from the developing world.

      Western popular music incorporating elements of traditional music from the developing world.

    • n. noun

      idle chatter.

      used to refer to a pitched ball that passes very close to the batter's chin:

    • n. noun

      printed music, as opposed to performed or recorded music.

      music published in single or interleaved sheets, not bound.

    • n. noun

      a theater where musical events are staged.

      a form of variety entertainment popular in Britain from circa 1850, consisting of singing, dancing, comedy, acrobatics, and novelty acts. Its popularity declined after World War I with the rise of the movie industry.

    • n. noun

      a form of popular music that evolved from rock and roll and pop music during the mid- and late 1960s. Harsher and often self-consciously more serious than its predecessors, it was initially characterized by musical experimentation and drug-related or anti-Establishment lyrics.
    • n. noun

      music appealing to the popular taste, including rock and pop and also soul, country, reggae, rap, and dance music.
    • n. noun

      music performed using synthesizers and other electronic instruments.
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