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  1. prem·ise
    IPA[ˈpreməs]
  2. noun

    • 1. a previous statement or proposition from which another is inferred or follows as a conclusion:

      if the premise is true, then the conclusion must be true
    • 2. an assertion or proposition which forms the basis for a work or theory:

      the fundamental premise of the report

    verb

    • 1. base an argument, theory, or undertaking on:

      the reforms were premised on our findings
    • 2. state or presuppose (something) as a premise:

      one school of thought premised that the cosmos is indestructible
    • 3. state by way of introduction:

      I will premise generally that I hate lecturing
  3. Variation

    • n.: noun: premise, plural noun: premises

    • v.: verb: premise, 3rd person present: premises, gerund or present participle: premising, past tense: premised, past participle: premised

    • noun

      a previous statement or proposition from which another is inferred or follows as a conclusion:

      an assertion or proposition which forms the basis for a work or theory:

    • verb

      base an argument, theory, or undertaking on:

      state or presuppose (something) as a premise:

    • plural

      a house or building, together with its land and outbuildings, occupied by a business or considered in an official context:
    • plural

      a house or building, together with its land and outbuildings, occupied by a business or considered in an official context:
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